Last spring I needed to replace a broken fan. I drove to Home Depot and studied the various types of fans offered. The Vornado packaging caught my eye due to the product benefits listed on the box.

vornado-1

I especially liked the clearly visible call-to-action to see the fan in action on the company’s website.

vornado-2

I stood there in the aisle with my iPhone and visited the URL that took me to a landing page with a video. The video opens in YouTube and clearly states why the Vornado fan is different.

vornado-landing

Sold. I bought two. 🙂

I’ve been paying attention — a lot! — to how I interact with websites using my mobile devices. What catches my attention? What works and what doesn’t? Which sites are set up for mobile? I find I browse and shop using my iPad (versus my laptop), a behavior that’s inline with what others do, according to this report from Google — The New Multi-Screen World Study.

At the time I bought the fans, I didn’t take a picture of the box and have been wishing I had because I’ve used the Vornado example multiple times to show why mobile is gaining in importance, why B2B companies need to prepare for its affects now (versus two years from now when it will be too late) and how to integrate your online content with offline tactics.

I’m in good company because Microsoft is thinking the same thing.

This week, due to the heatwave, I needed a Vornado fan for my office — so I bought one — and happily took a picture of the box just so I could use the screenshots in this post (and future presentations). 🙂

How is mobile changing your buying behaviors? How can B2B take advantage of product packaging to drive sales — other than listing the website URL on the box? Do you think QR codes have potential? I know people swear by them, but truthfully, I don’t use them or scan them.

One idea I love: The Container Store lists its guiding principles on the packing tape it uses. I liked this idea so much, I went to the company’s website to learn more about them.